2019 Spring Symposium Workshops: Digital Storytelling – Google Tour Builder with Rebecca Goodrich

Teaching is above all, about storytelling. The stories we tell our students, and ask them to tell us, often document the ways we’ve impacted the world and been changed in the process. History, English, Mathematics and many other subjects use narratives to connect the topic to location, geophysical features, environmental changes, and more. Simple multimedia storytelling platforms and apps abound which allow us to connect our stories to place using text, photos, videos, and maps. This workshop will introduce participants to Google Tour Builder, a user-friendly, web-based tool that creates an immersive, interactive storytelling experience for your students (and yourself).

In this workshop, we will discuss digital storytelling as a both an outlet for individual creativity and self-understanding, as well as a powerful learning tool in a variety of disciplines. We will discuss ways to adapt our stories to the digital environment using Tour Builder and ways to adapt Tour Builder to course assignments or projects. If possible, participants should bring a laptop or tablet as well as digital content such as images, online links, videos, and audio clips to practice uploading into their Google Tour. To create a Google Tour participants will need a Google account.

Rebecca Goodrich teaches digital storytelling in the Digital Technology and Culture degree program. She has also facilitated many digital storytelling projects including the Viva Farms Digital Storytelling Project, the Golden Grads Digital Storytelling Workshop, and the Plateau Women’s Digital Storytelling Workshop.

Examples of Google Tour Builder projects:

BRAC: Defeating Global Poverty

Central Coast Marine Protected Areas Tour

March 5th, 2019, 9:00-10:15 am, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Questions? Please contact Rebecca Goodrich: rgoodrich@wsu.edu

2019 Spring Symposium Workshops: StoryMaps with David Bolingbroke

Story Maps is a great program for presenting digital scholarship that is visually engaging and geographically focused. It allows scholars to narrate places as dynamic and show how people and landscapes have shaped one another over time. In this workshop, David will share his experience with Story Maps before going over the program’s different exhibit templates, map building, and uploading digital content forms like text, images, audio, and video. He also will discuss the kinds of stories participants could tell with this program and what templates would best match those ideas. The last half of the workshop will provide the participants with the opportunity to begin experimenting with their own maps.
If able, participants should bring a laptop or tablet as well as some ideas for digital content they could practice uploading into their map. These include online images, videos, and audio clips. To familiarize themselves with Story Maps before coming in, David encourages participants to browse through the Resources page on the program’s website.

Here are three good examples of maps that use different templates: Bears Ears: A Story of Homelands, America’s Nuclear Moonscape, and Segregation by the Sea.

Led by David Bolingbroke, PhD Candidate, Department of History, WSU

Tuesday, March 5th, 2019, 10:35-11:50 am, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Questions? Please contact David Bolingbroke: david.bolingbroke@wsu.edu

2019 CDSC Spring Symposium Workshops: Using Scalar for History and Perceptions of Place with Andrew Gillreath-Brown

Scalar is a free open-source digital humanities publishing platform designed for presenting digital scholarship online in non-linear, engaging, and collaborative ways. In this workshop, Andrew will discuss how Scalar can be used to represent and visualize your ideas in new ways, ranging from topics of history to interactive digital books. Andrew will discuss how he used Scalar for a project entitled “Washington State University Buildings and Landscapes” that combined digital humanities, publishing, and history, which also led to changes in his perceptions of place.

Following discussion, participants will have an opportunity to work hands-on with Scalar, whether working with Scalar for the classroom or digital scholarship. Participants are encouraged to bring possible project ideas to share with the group, and can bring media or content to work with if desired. Bringing your own laptop to work on is encouraged, but not required.

Led by Andrew Gillreath-Brown, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, WSU

Tuesday, March 5th, 2019, 9:00-10:15 am, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Questions? Please contact Andrew Gillreath-Brown: andrew.d.brown@wsu.edu

Spring 2019 Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Questions? Please contact Tor de Vries: tor.devries@wsu.edu

Coding Demystified

Wednesday, February 13th, 2019, 2:00-3:30pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

What exactly are “programming languages”? How does “coding” in a “language” send an email, search Google, upload a photo to Instagram, print a document, or anything else in the digital world?
This workshop introduces basic universal concepts of computer programming. It will not teach a specific coding language. Instead, it will introduce the most common, fundamental ideas and logical structures. Understanding these concepts is the first step in understanding programming.
Examples will be reviewed, along with suggested resources for additional learning, reference, and experimentation.

Led by Tor de Vries, Instructor, Digital Technology and Culture

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Better Web Browsing

Tuesday, February 26th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

As we spend more of our time collectively online, it has become important to know more about the tools we use to connect with various websites, apps, and through which we do everything from pursue research to play games. This workshop will provide background on the differences between the most popular browsers, and some tips and tricks for customizing your web browsing experience with tools, settings, and extensions/plugins, making time spent online more productive, engaging, and enjoyable. We will also delve into the ways in which your browser can help you to take more control over your digital footprint. To that end, we’ll review settings and configurations; discuss maintenance habits; and review a few specific plug-ins and extensions that can enhance security online.

Led by Richard Snyder, DTC Instructor and Ph.D. Student, English

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Students should try to bring their own laptop if they have one. We’ll be working with Edge, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. Of course, phone browsers also have some things we could talk about, but that won’t be the focus for this talk.

 

Email Best Practices

Wednesday, March 20th, 2019, 2:00-3:30pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

With email serving as the primary method of digital communication in the workplace, it’s important to know how to send a good one. The process of sending a good email, though, goes beyond merely typing a message and hitting “send.” Good emails equally rely on the ability to compose and organize messages effectively. That makes it crucial to understand both the full functionality of email services and the etiquette of email correspondence. This workshop will help participants make the most of their email by applying appropriate discourse conventions, customizing settings, organizing messages, and prioritizing responses.

Led by Lacy Hope, Ph.D. Student, English

Registration is not required for this workshop.

This workshop will require participants to bring a digital device (preferably a laptop or tablet) and have access to their WSU Outlook account

Creative Commons & Intellectual Property

Wednesday, March 27th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Have you ever wondered if you have the right to use an image in a presentation or on a website? Or maybe you’ve wanted to adapt an existing piece of music, change up a design, or include someone else’s infographic in your paper? Understanding copyright and Creative Commons licensing can help you determine how authors and creators intend for their work to be shared, used, and reused by others. This workshop will cover the basics of copyright licensing, with particular emphasis on Creative Commons licenses: what they are, how to find CC-licensed material, and how to license one’s own work with CC.

Led by Tor de Vries, Instructor, Digital Technology and Culture

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Digital Mindfulness

Friday, April 12th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Do you feel overwhelmed by the number of emails and texts you receive each day? Confused by the number of websites and electronic resources assigned for various classes? Or frustrated by the pressure you feel to keep up with friends and family on social media? Digital mindfulness helps us focus our attention at any given moment, and draws our awareness to how we feel when engaging in digital practices. This workshop will introduce you to the basic concepts of mindfulness as they apply to the use of technology. It will also help you develop an individual plan to understand and therefore manage your personal digital tendencies. Mindfulness does not make the pressures of our technology-rich lives disappear, but it offers a path to sanity through better understanding of how we behave when confronted with digital communication options.

Led by Dr. Josh Misner, Associate Professor of Communication, Communication and Fine Arts Division, North Idaho College

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Please bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone with you.

Operating Systems

Wednesday, April 24th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Have you ever wanted to know more about your computer and why it runs so many processes and services? This workshop will cover a number of topics ranging from a short history of the evolution of modern operating systems to a survey of modern general and specialty operating systems. The session will end by breaking down the Windows 10 task list.

Led by Alex Merrill, Head of Systems and Technical Operations, WSU Libraries

Registration is not required for this workshop, but please bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone if possible

Digital Foundations Workshop: Creative Commons & Intellectual Property

Have you ever wondered if you have the right to use an image in a presentation or on a website? Or maybe you’ve wanted to adapt an existing piece of music, change up a design, or include someone else’s infographic in your paper? Understanding copyright and Creative Commons licensing can help you determine how authors and creators intend for their work to be shared, used, and reused by others. This workshop will cover the basics of copyright licensing, with particular emphasis on Creative Commons licenses: what they are, how to find CC-licensed material, and how to license one’s own work with CC.

Led by Tor de Vries, Instructor, Digital Technology and Culture

Wednesday, March 27th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Questions? Please contact Tor de Vries: tor.devries@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Digital Mindfulness

If you ever find yourself feeling overwhelmed by the never-ending barrage of notifications playing tug-of-war with your attention span from one moment to the next, it might be time for a digital detox. Or, if you ever experience feelings of inadequacy because everyone else’s lives on social media seem so much more attractive than the one you lead, then perhaps digital mindfulness could be the cure. Developing digital mindfulness through digital detoxes and other activities allows us to recover control of our attention spans by developing awareness of how we behave while engaging with digital systems. This workshop will highlight the problems of life in the Age of Distraction and introduce the basic concepts of mindfulness as they apply to everyday life, especially with our increasing reliance on technology. Mindfulness does not make the pressures of our technology-rich lives disappear, but it offers a path to sanity by helping us understand how we behave when confronted with digital communication options.

Led by Dr. Josh Misner, Associate Professor of Communication, Communication and Fine Arts Division, North Idaho College

Friday, April 12th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Please bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone with you.

Questions? Please contact Tor de Vries: tor.devries@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Coding Demystified

Digital Foundations Workshop: Coding Demystified

What exactly are “programming languages”? How does “coding” in a “language” send an email, search Google, upload a photo to Instagram, print a document, or anything else in the digital world?

This workshop introduces basic universal concepts of computer programming. It will not teach a specific coding language. Instead, it will introduce the most common, fundamental ideas and logical structures. Understanding these concepts is the first step in understanding programming.

Examples will be reviewed, along with suggested resources for additional learning, reference, and experimentation.

Led by Tor de Vries, Instructor, Digital Technology and Culture

Wednesday, February 13th, 2019, 2:00-3:30pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Questions? Please contact Tor de Vries: tor.devries@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Operating Systems


Have you ever wanted to know more about your computer and why it runs so many processes and services? This workshop will cover a number of topics ranging from a short history of the evolution of modern operating systems to a survey of modern general and specialty operating systems. The session will end by breaking down the Windows 10 task list.

Led by Alex Merrill, Head of Systems and Technical Operations, WSU Libraries

Wednesday, April 24th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop, but please bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone if possible

Questions? Please contact Tor de Vries: tor.devries@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Email Best Practices

With email serving as the primary method of digital communication in the workplace, it’s important to know how to send a good one. The process of sending a good email, though, goes beyond merely typing a message and hitting “send.” Good emails equally rely on the ability to compose and organize messages effectively. That makes it crucial to understand both the full functionality of email services and the etiquette of email correspondence. This workshop will help participants make the most of their email by applying appropriate discourse conventions, customizing settings, organizing messages, and prioritizing responses.

Led by Lacy Hope, Ph.D. Student, English

Wednesday, March 20th, 2019, 2:00-3:30pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

This workshop will require participants to bring a digital device (preferably a laptop or tablet) and have access to their WSU Outlook account

Questions? Please contact Tor de Vries: tor.devries@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Better Web Browsing

As we spend more of our time collectively online, it has become important to know more about the tools we use to connect with various websites, apps, and through which we do everything from pursue research to play games. This workshop will provide background on the differences between the most popular browsers, and some tips and tricks for customizing your web browsing experience with tools, settings, and extensions/plugins, making time spent online more productive, engaging, and enjoyable. We will also delve into the ways in which your browser can help you to take more control over your digital footprint. To that end, we’ll review settings and configurations; discuss maintenance habits; and review a few specific plug-ins and extensions that can enhance security online.

Led by Richard Snyder, DTC Instructor and Ph.D. Student, English

Tuesday, February 26th, 2019, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop.

Students should try to bring their own laptop if they have one. We’ll be working with Edge, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. Of course, phone browsers also have some things we could talk about, but that won’t be the focus for this talk.


Questions? Please contact Tor de Vries: tor.devries@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

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