Omeka

February 19th and 21st, 2:30-4:30 pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Do you want to create an engaging web exhibit to display, publicize, and provide access to your research? Learn to build online media-rich exhibits using Omeka Classic, an open-source exhibit tool and web publishing platform. This will be a two part workshop. On the first day, attendees will learn to set up an Omeka site as an administrator, upload materials, and investigate a selection of plugins that extend Omeka’s functionality to include features like exhibit-building, timelines, and text analysis. On the second day, attendees will bring a selection of their own material for a hands-on content creation and exhibit building workshop.

Omeka provides an engaging, interactive platform for your research and collections. Attendees will come away with the know-how to set up an Omeka site, upload collections, and create an interactive exhibit.

Please register here. Limited to 15 participants. This is a TWO-PART workshop, participants are signing up to attend both days.

Bringing a personal laptop to work on is encouraged, but not required.

If you have any questions, please contact the CDSC.

Pinpoints: Using Story Maps to Share a Narrative

Tuesday, March 19th, 2:00-4:00 pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

In this workshop, participants will learn to effectively use Esri Story Maps, a program that facilitates the combination of detailed maps with text, images, and multimedia in the interest of telling precise and engaging stories. Story maps can be made for a wide variety of subjects and are ideal for both historic narratives and developing stories.

Workshop participants will have an opportunity to work hands-on with Story Maps, and CDSC staff will guide a discussion for working with Story Maps as a tool for presenting digital scholarship. Participants are encouraged to bring possible project ideas to share with the group, and can bring media or content to work with as desired. Workstations containing the most recent Esri ArcGIS software, as well as Geospatial Data Sources, are available in the Dimensions Lab on the first floor of Holland Library.

Two sample Story Maps are Mapping Hemingway in Idaho, and The State of America’s Forests: An Interactive Guide.

Please register here. Limited to 15 participants

Bringing a personal laptop to work on is encouraged, but not required.

If you have any questions, please contact the CDSC.

Image Scanning

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of how to identify, preserve, and scan their photographs. We will walk through common types of photographs, resources of where to do more research, recommended supplies and environments to use to when saving photos, and how to safely scan and save high quality digital images. Whether you are a family historian, the keeper of your department’s photo collection, or just have a personal scanning project, this workshop will get you started off strong. This workshop is open to faculty, staff, students, and community members.

Topics covered: Identification and preservation, scanning images and documents, managing digital files.

Please register here. Limited to 12 participants.

If you have any questions, please contact the CDSC.

Using Scalar for your Research and in your Classroom

Wednesday, November 14th, 2:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Scalar is a free authoring and publishing platform designed for presenting digital scholarship online in alternative, engaging, and collaborative ways. Scalar support easy media integration, and includes a range of annotation, timeline, mapping, and other visualization tools.

Workshop participants will have an opportunity to work hands-on with Scalar, and CDSC staff will guide a discussion for planning and working with Scalar in your classroom, and as a tool for presenting your digital scholarship. Participants are encouraged to bring possible project ideas to share with the group, and can bring media or content to work with if desired.

Two examples of Scalar sites are In the Shadow of Sludge:the Legacy of Coal Waste in Appalachia, and Sailing the British Empire: The Voyages of The Clarence, 1858-73.

Please register here. Limit 12 participants.
Bringing your own laptop to work on is encouraged, but not required.

If you have any questions, please contact the CDSC.

Our Many Lives on Social Media

Our Many Lives on Social Media

In this workshop, participants will analyze and curate artifacts from our social media histories, including our choice of posts or collections on Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Twitter, or other social media platforms. Participants will analyze selected social media posts in terms of their historical contexts, intended audiences, personal revelations, and strategic concealments in order to craft a narrative about the person we aspire to be on social media, while also developing our awareness of the limitations of social media in capturing the complexity of our lives.

Led by Leeann Hunter, Clinical Assistant Professor of English

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018, 3:30-5:00pm, Avery Hall – Bundy Reading Room

No registration is required for this workshop. Facebook Event Link.

Please bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone with you if possible

*This workshop is a collaboration between Leeann Hunter’s Passport Program in the English Department and the CDSC. The workshop will be held in the Bundy Reading Room in Avery Hall.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Best Email Practices

Digital Foundations Workshop: Best Email Practices

With email serving as the primary method of digital communication in the workplace, it’s important to know how to send a good one. The process of sending a good email, though, goes beyond merely typing a message and hitting “send.” Good emails equally rely on the ability to compose and organize messages effectively. That makes it crucial to understand both the full functionality of email services and the etiquette of email correspondence. This workshop will help participants make the most of their email by applying appropriate discourse conventions, customizing settings, organizing messages, and prioritizing responses.

Led by Lacy Hope, Ph.D. Student, English

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018, 3:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop. Facebook event link.

This workshop will require participants to bring a digital device (preferably a laptop or tablet) and have access to their WSU Outlook account

Questions? Please contact Kristin Becker: kristin.carlson@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Digital Privacy – Tools for Daily Living

Digital Foundations Workshop: Digital Privacy – Tools for Daily Living

Every day we read about hacking, digital surveillance, and more connected to the pervasive technological world in which we live. What are the implications of digital technologies in terms of our personal identities and our privacy? This workshop will review some of the issues surrounding digital privacy, and will provide a hands-on opportunity to learn about tools and resources to help you protect your own digital privacy.

Led by Lorena O’English, Social Sciences and Government Documents Librarian, WSU Libraries

Monday, March 5th, 2018, 3:00-5:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop. Facebook event link.

Please bring a laptop if possible.

Questions? Please contact Kristin Becker: kristin.carlson@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

Digital Foundations Workshop: Better Web Browsing

Digital Foundations Workshop: Better Web Browsing

As we spend more of our time collectively online, it has become important to know more about the tools we use to connect with various websites, apps, and through which we do everything from pursue research to play games. This workshop will provide background on the differences between the most popular browsers, and some tips and tricks for customizing your web browsing experience with tools, settings, and extensions/plugins, making time spent online more productive, engaging, and enjoyable. We will also delve into the ways in which your browser can help you to take more control over your digital footprint. To that end, we’ll review settings and configurations; discuss maintenance habits; and review a few specific plug-ins and extensions that can enhance security online.

Led by Richard Snyder, DTC Instructor and Ph.D. Student, English

Monday, February 26th, 2018, 3:00-4:00pm, CDSC, 4th floor Holland Library

Registration is not required for this workshop. Facebook event link.

Students should try to bring their own laptop if they have one. We’ll be working with Edge, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. Of course, phone browsers also have some things we could talk about, but that won’t be the focus for this talk.

Questions? Please contact Kristin Becker: kristin.carlson@wsu.edu

Digital Foundations Workshops

The CDSC offers a series of intensive workshops for WSU students seeking hands-on instruction in the foundations of digital literacy. Facility with digital tools has become a fundamental prerequisite for joining any contemporary profession and, as with reading and writing skills, college instructors across the disciplines expect students to arrive on campus with a foundational level of digital literacy. Such expectations mean that many students never receive explicit guidance in how to write emails, organize files, or engage in online communities. These workshops fill that general education gap by helping students cultivate essential skills and develop good digital habits for the future. We intend the workshops to serve all interested students, regardless of major or prior experience. Workshop sessions will be 30-40 minutes, with 20-30 minutes for questions and one-on-one assistance. Grad students, staff, and faculty are also always welcome.

CDSC Spring Symposium 2018: Open Gameplay & Keynote with Matt Swanson

CDSC Spring Symposium 2018

Multiplayer: Critical Perspectives on Video Games and Online Environments

Games and online environments allow for infinite possibilities to create new personas and new societies that are radically different than real life.  But this freedom doesn’t mean that online everyone is equal and social inequities are not replicated.  Acknowledging that virtual worlds replicate the social values of their creators is a small part of the 2017-2018 WSU Common Reading book, “Ready Player One,” when one character reveals that offline they are definitely nothing like their avatar and they did this to embody a more privileged space in the Oasis, the virtual world at the core of the story.  The same goal – to complicate games and online environments – is something that guests for this symposium are all interested in doing in their scholarship and praxis.  The presenters will critique, interrupt, and challenge game play so our digital future is does not simply replicate and reinforce the inequity of our analog past.

Sponsors:

Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation, WSU Libraries, Native Programs, English Department, History Department, Asia Program, Sociology Department, and Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies Department.


March 7th: Open Gameplay & Keynote with Matt Swanson (Facebook Event)

  • Wednesday, March 7th
  • 5:00-6:00pm, Open Gameplay of Never Alone, Spark 10
  • 6:00-7:00pm, Keynote with Matt Swanson, Spark Atrium

Game Producer and Project Manager Matt Swanson will present the keynote for the CDSC Spring Symposium. Swanson brings over fifteen years of project management, marketing and design experience to his role as Executive Producer at E-Line Media. With a passion for creating games, supporting creative teams, developing inspirational products and a drive for excellence, Matt oversees all aspects of production in E-Line’s Seattle studio. Most recently he guided production through the successful multi-platform worldwide launch of the award-winning Never Alone (Kisima Ingitchuna). Swanson’s talk will be preceded by open gameplay of Never Alone from 5-6 pm in Spark 10.

Verification of attendance available for Common Reading.


See the full schedule for the day-long symposium on March 8th

CDSC Spring Symposium 2018

CDSC Spring Symposium 2018

Multiplayer: Critical Perspectives on Video Games and Online Environments

Games and online environments allow for infinite possibilities to create new personas and new societies that are radically different than real life.  But this freedom doesn’t mean that online everyone is equal and social inequities are not replicated.  Acknowledging that virtual worlds replicate the social values of their creators is a small part of the 2017-2018 WSU Common Reading book, “Ready Player One,” when one character reveals that offline they are definitely nothing like their avatar and they did this to embody a more privileged space in the Oasis, the virtual world at the core of the story.  The same goal – to complicate games and online environments – is something that guests for this symposium are all interested in doing in their scholarship and praxis.  The presenters will critique, interrupt, and challenge game play so our digital future is does not simply replicate and reinforce the inequity of our analog past.

Sponsors:

Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation, WSU Libraries, Native Programs, English Department, History Department, Asia Program, Sociology Department, and Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies Department.


See the schedule for the Open Gameplay & Keynote with Matt Swanson on March 7th


March 8th: Symposium and Workshops 

Symposium (Facebook Event)

9:00-10:00am

Dr. Megan Condis, Assistant Professor of English, Stephen F. Austin State University
Speaking Topic: Gender, Gaming, and Online Culture

Dr. Condis completed her PhD at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her forthcoming book, Gaming Masculinity: Trolls, Fake Geeks, and the Gendered Battle for Online Culture, examines the way video game fans compose their identities online.  She is a regular contributor to Unwinnable.  She also serves as a member of the Editorial Board for Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities (University of Nebraska Press) and the Journal of Gaming and Virtual Worlds (Intellect Books).  She writes about gender and popular culture on her blog at https://megancondis.wordpress.com/ and on Twitter @MeganCondis.

10:00-11:00am

Dr. Edmond Y. Chang, Assistant Professor of English, Ohio University
Speaking Topic: Technonormativity

Dr. Chang’s areas of interest include technoculture, gender and sexuality, cultural studies, video games, popular culture, and contemporary American literature. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Washington and his dissertation is entitled “Technoqueer: Re/con/figuring Posthuman Narratives.”  This past fall, he taught a class at called “Ready Player Two: Critical Approaches to Virtual Worlds and Video Games.”  Recent publications include “Queergaming” in Queer Game Studies (University of Minnesota Press) and “A Game Chooses, A Player Obeys: BioShock, Posthumanism, and the Limits of Queerness” in Gaming Representation (Indiana University Press).  He is currently working on his first book tentatively called Queerness Cannot Be Designed: Digital Games and the Trouble with Technonormativity.

11:00am-12:00pm

Dr. Kishonna L. Gray, Assistant Professor in the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the New College, Arizona State University  
Speaking Topic: Intersectionality in Online Environments

Dr. Gray is also a Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.  She previously served as a MLK Scholar and Visiting Professor in Women & Gender Studies and Comparative Media Studies at MIT.  Her work broadly intersects identity and new media although she has a particular focus on gaming.  She is the author of Race, Gender, & Deviance in Xbox Live (Routledge, 2014) which as been described by T.L. Taylor “an insightful, original, and compelling piece of research.” Her current monograph is tentatively titled “On Being Black And…The Journey to Intersectionality in Digital Gaming Culture” and is currently under contract with LSU Press.  Her work has been featured in both academic and public outlets.  She’s is also a featured blogger and podcaster with “Not Your Mama’s Gamer.”  Follow her on Twitter @KishonnaGray.

Workshops (Facebook event)

1:30pm – 3:30pm

Matt Swanson – An Overview of the Game Creation Process

Edmond Chang – #WeNeedDiverseGames: Close Playing Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Games

3:30pm – 5:30pm

Megan Condis – Introduction to Creating Interactive Games with Twine

Kishonna Gray – Designing Games for Empathy

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